×
×
homepage logo

Man reveals fond memories of Shady Nook Park

By Staff | Aug 3, 2016

BARB BARRETT/The Luminary Charles K. Glidewell from Hughesville reminisces over his collection of photos from his childhood days spending time at Shady Nook Park owned by his grandfather, Henry Glidewell.

Editor’s Note:

Charles (Kimbu) Glidewell who grew up in Shady Nook Park during this time, wanted to share his story with our readers and record its history as the Luminary celebrates 175 years serving the local community. More history and the park’s origins will be revealed in a second part.

HUGHESVILLE – Charles (Kimbu) Glidewell from Hughesville grew up during a roaring time. His grandfather, Henry Glidewell was the owner and operator of Shady Nook, a popular recreation center and picnic ground for young people in Hughesville during the 1920s and 30s. The park was located where the Angus Inn is now, just off Route 220. Before that, the land was used for grazing cattle.

Charles, Henry’s grandson, was born and raised on the north side of the pavilion which was part of the Shady Nook park. Charles said he remembers a barn too, where his grandfather kept his horse named Kernel that pulled a wagon delivering bread to the Hughesville area.

“My grandfather, Henry Glidewell, was always busy building and repairing tables and play equipment for the park. Sometimes I would be there to help,” said Charles Glidewell who spoke of fond memories from his boyhood.

PHOTO PROVIDED This is an old photo of Shady Nook Park's picnic pavilion that once stood where the Angus Inn is now and some resemblance of its structure can still be seen on the premises.

Charles, who is now 88, remembers three different sliding boards built from wood for all ages. “To make them slide faster, you would slide down on a piece of wax paper that you got off of a loaf of bread back then. You could really zip down them after that.” Often children would play tag or find many a mishap from the seesaw because they would use the cross bar to do somersaults or the like.

“Some would jump off leaving you to fall or bounce. My dog and I liked to seesaw!”

A set of two swings got used often. “Sometimes they were used to see how high you could go, or maybe see how far you could jump off of them.”

There was also a store. It had a tea room with a kitchen and a few tables were set for serving ice cream and hot and cold sandwiches. Charles said his grandfather had a variety of candy and popsicles sold in the store.

The picnic grounds were used often for family reunions, and there was a great place to swim above the dam. It was shallow on the one side and got deeper on the “frog town” side which had a diving board made by Frog Town Tech, a club with Jiggs Hoffman as President and “whose father was a constable that kept the kids in the neighborhood on their toes.”

There were some safety issues, however, as one had to be careful of swifter waters that raced by from the nearby water company. Water tag was always a fun time for older children. Those swimmers, who just learned, had to be careful and a few needed help to get back to safety after being caught in the stream.

Fishing was also a popular past time there. Below the dam many fish like trout, bass, pike, water dogs and sun fish were often there but the dam could be treacherous according to Charles. “It would become very slippery especially on the boards, and you could wind up below the dam.” He said he would often find his teacher there, Clayton Houseknecht who was an “avid fisherman.” He was also a big coon hunter and would join Charles’ father, Kenneth Glidewell, many a night hunting.

Below the dam were signs of an old wooden covered bridge. “Blue, my granddad’s hunting dog, was also a fixture at the park for the summer. It was just a little, friendly dog he had for rabbit season.”

On nice days, many would gather to play softball and horse shoes. Charles recollected some familiar names: Don Bubb from Bubb’s Barber Shop; Dick Fought from Fought’s Grocery; Jim Montgomery, the plumber; George Freezer from Freezer’s Auto Parts; Morris Egli from Egli’s Meat Market; and many others like Dolly Poust and Mary Ashkar enjoyed the festivities at the park.

“Judd Faus of Faus Hall was there a lot. He was amazing how he would just float around reading a book and smoking a cigar with his hat on.”

Across the road from Shady Nook Park stood Price’s Dairy and milk route. Henry Glidewell would purchase ice from there for the ice house in the barn. “When they would get their ice, we would have to be careful when playing our hockey games and skating especially at night.”

The picnic pavilion was used often. It had a stove under it and outside there was a covered fire pit that was frequently used for roasting corn. Charles remembers that the only water on the premises was located at the back of the store.

“The Store Pavilion was known for its dances with some well known bands playing there,” he added. “I was too little to attend, but I would listen to them from my bedroom. It had a piano in there for the public to use and it had a pair of shuffle board games.”

All types of interesting people would show up at Shady Nook Park. Some would come up for the day and others would stay a week or two. Charles remembers a typewriter repairman, an artist and even a group making some “wicker-like items.”

Yes, this park was a very popular place for Hughesville and the surrounding area for many years.

Man reveals fond memories of Shady Nook Park

By Staff | Aug 3, 2016

BARB BARRETT/The Luminary Charles K. Glidewell from Hughesville reminisces over his collection of photos from his childhood days spending time at Shady Nook Park owned by his grandfather, Henry Glidewell.

Editor’s Note:

Charles (Kimbu) Glidewell who grew up in Shady Nook Park during this time, wanted to share his story with our readers and record its history as the Luminary celebrates 175 years serving the local community. More history and the park’s origins will be revealed in a second part.

HUGHESVILLE – Charles (Kimbu) Glidewell from Hughesville grew up during a roaring time. His grandfather, Henry Glidewell was the owner and operator of Shady Nook, a popular recreation center and picnic ground for young people in Hughesville during the 1920s and 30s. The park was located where the Angus Inn is now, just off Route 220. Before that, the land was used for grazing cattle.

Charles, Henry’s grandson, was born and raised on the north side of the pavilion which was part of the Shady Nook park. Charles said he remembers a barn too, where his grandfather kept his horse named Kernel that pulled a wagon delivering bread to the Hughesville area.

“My grandfather, Henry Glidewell, was always busy building and repairing tables and play equipment for the park. Sometimes I would be there to help,” said Charles Glidewell who spoke of fond memories from his boyhood.

PHOTO PROVIDED This is an old photo of Shady Nook Park's picnic pavilion that once stood where the Angus Inn is now and some resemblance of its structure can still be seen on the premises.

Charles, who is now 88, remembers three different sliding boards built from wood for all ages. “To make them slide faster, you would slide down on a piece of wax paper that you got off of a loaf of bread back then. You could really zip down them after that.” Often children would play tag or find many a mishap from the seesaw because they would use the cross bar to do somersaults or the like.

“Some would jump off leaving you to fall or bounce. My dog and I liked to seesaw!”

A set of two swings got used often. “Sometimes they were used to see how high you could go, or maybe see how far you could jump off of them.”

There was also a store. It had a tea room with a kitchen and a few tables were set for serving ice cream and hot and cold sandwiches. Charles said his grandfather had a variety of candy and popsicles sold in the store.

The picnic grounds were used often for family reunions, and there was a great place to swim above the dam. It was shallow on the one side and got deeper on the “frog town” side which had a diving board made by Frog Town Tech, a club with Jiggs Hoffman as President and “whose father was a constable that kept the kids in the neighborhood on their toes.”

There were some safety issues, however, as one had to be careful of swifter waters that raced by from the nearby water company. Water tag was always a fun time for older children. Those swimmers, who just learned, had to be careful and a few needed help to get back to safety after being caught in the stream.

Fishing was also a popular past time there. Below the dam many fish like trout, bass, pike, water dogs and sun fish were often there but the dam could be treacherous according to Charles. “It would become very slippery especially on the boards, and you could wind up below the dam.” He said he would often find his teacher there, Clayton Houseknecht who was an “avid fisherman.” He was also a big coon hunter and would join Charles’ father, Kenneth Glidewell, many a night hunting.

Below the dam were signs of an old wooden covered bridge. “Blue, my granddad’s hunting dog, was also a fixture at the park for the summer. It was just a little, friendly dog he had for rabbit season.”

On nice days, many would gather to play softball and horse shoes. Charles recollected some familiar names: Don Bubb from Bubb’s Barber Shop; Dick Fought from Fought’s Grocery; Jim Montgomery, the plumber; George Freezer from Freezer’s Auto Parts; Morris Egli from Egli’s Meat Market; and many others like Dolly Poust and Mary Ashkar enjoyed the festivities at the park.

“Judd Faus of Faus Hall was there a lot. He was amazing how he would just float around reading a book and smoking a cigar with his hat on.”

Across the road from Shady Nook Park stood Price’s Dairy and milk route. Henry Glidewell would purchase ice from there for the ice house in the barn. “When they would get their ice, we would have to be careful when playing our hockey games and skating especially at night.”

The picnic pavilion was used often. It had a stove under it and outside there was a covered fire pit that was frequently used for roasting corn. Charles remembers that the only water on the premises was located at the back of the store.

“The Store Pavilion was known for its dances with some well known bands playing there,” he added. “I was too little to attend, but I would listen to them from my bedroom. It had a piano in there for the public to use and it had a pair of shuffle board games.”

All types of interesting people would show up at Shady Nook Park. Some would come up for the day and others would stay a week or two. Charles remembers a typewriter repairman, an artist and even a group making some “wicker-like items.”

Yes, this park was a very popular place for Hughesville and the surrounding area for many years.